CULTURAL TIPS FOR NEW AMERICANS UNDER TRUMP at SPRING/BREAK ART SHOW 2018 / by Alina Bliumis

ALINA & JEFF BLIUMIS / CULTURAL TIPS FOR NEW AMERICANS UNDER TRUMP

CURATED BY KSENIA M. SOBOLEVA

SPRING/BREAK Art Show 2018 STRANGER COMES TO TOWN

March 6 - March 12, 2018
4 Times Square, NYC (Entrance at 140 West 43rd Street) 

Bliumis_Cultural_Tips_install_VER_150DPI.jpg

Throughout their practice, Alina and Jeff Bliumis engage in an ongoing investigation into foreignness and the ontology of cultural misfits. As exemplified by the title of their first catalogue, Receiving the Stranger, the artists’ work is rooted in the desire to communicate through difference. Using communication as the medium par excellence, their projects raise questions around what constitutes community, what constitutes borders, and how the former are shaped by the latter. Most importantly, the artists acknowledge that language itself can function as a border, as a paradigm of power, and can be used to frame communities. In the words of literary theorist Leo Bersani, language doesn’t merely describe identity but actually produces it.

Cultural Tips for New Americans Under Trump reiterates a project that Alina & Jeff Bliumis first undertook in 2011. In this earlier it- eration, Cultural Tips for New Americans, the artists set out to compile advice that people who consider themselves “real Americans” give to newcomers, to supposedly help them assimilate to their new surroundings. Characterized by a certain lightheartedness and humor, these cultural tips in fact reveal inherent aspects of American society and say more about Americans themselves than the communities to whom they address their advice. Having immigrated to the United States from Eastern Europe, Alina and Jeff Bliumis picked up on this American encouragement to “blend in” early on. Now, in the wake of our current political climate, the artists felt an urgency to revisit this project, and gathered additional cultural tips for new Americans living under the Trump presidency using handbooks, public forums, street question- naires, and social media. The collection of tips that resulted from the artists’ inquiry ranges from amusing suggestions (If someone says ‘come over anytime’ don’t take it literally) to harsh realities (Sometimes undocumented immigrants stay undocumented for a long time). Concur- rently, the artists collected ethnic wooden souvenirs, which radiate a certain fetishization of otherness, from all around New York City and sandblasted these objects to remove their original decorations and uncover the wood underneath. The cultural tips are then written onto the wooden souvenirs in ink, causing them to become decontextualized objects, much like the immigrants to whom the cultural tips are addressed.

The wooden sculptures are accompanied by Alina Bliumis’ recent series Most of Us Are and After Total War Comes Total Living. Rooted in the constructivist aesthetic of the 1920’s, these works reinforce the role of language in the construction of identity. Most of Us Are mixes up statistics of the “most typical” people worldwide, resulting in what could be considered portraits of generalized citizens, while After Total War Comes Total Living takes inspiration from the eponymous Cold War poster and brings propaganda rhetoric from the past into the present.

Jeff Bliumis’ series Dreamers is displayed in a separate room across the hall. Painted with oil on canvas, these works might seem to a disengaged viewer to be nothing more than portraits of people in the service industry. In actuality, the paintings capture the immigrant communities of New York City and explore the variety of intricate identities, adding a bodily presence to the cultural tips.

For more information, please contact Ksenia M. Soboleva at: ksenia.soboleva@nyu.edu